Many new dads want more days off

Switzerland has been discussing the introduction of paternity leave for almost two decades. Parliament has always stood in the way, but the mood is now changing. Voters could make a landmark decision in September.

Hauke Krenz and his two children. The stay-at-home dad epitomises the change in society. Photo provided

“State-funded paternity leave does not necessarily turn you into a good dad,” says businesswoman Diana Gutjahr. Photo: parlament.ch

“Swiss dads now play more of a hands-on role than they have ever done,” says trade unionist Adrian Wüthrich. Photo: parlament.ch

Hauke Krenz received just one day of paid leave from his employer for the birth of his first child. That was five years ago. Afterwards, he would have had to return to work and leave his wife and newborn on their own. But Krenz was having none of it. “I would have felt bad otherwise,” says Krenz who lives in the Geneva suburb of Lancy. “I wanted to be a part of the family from the start. That means taking responsibility and building a close relationship with my child. One day of paid leave often isn’t even enough to be properly involved in the birth.”

Krenz, who is a qualified business economist, consequently used his annual holiday entitlement to be with his wife and child in the weeks following the birth. At the same time, he protested “in the strongest possible terms” to his employer about being unable to take any extended paternity leave. The same employer has since changed its family policy, having allowed Krenz to take ten days of paternity leave when his second child was born two years ago. Attitudes are evidently changing.

Young professionals want attractive leave schemes

Krenz is by no means alone. Many young families in Switzerland now advocate the view that fathers also have an important postnatal role to play. Consequently, a growing number of Swiss companies are offering paternity leave in order to remain attractive to young professionals. Pharmaceutical firm Novartis leads the way, giving new dads 90 days of paid leave. Companies such as Migros, Coop and Swisscom grant 15 days.

However, there has never been any legislation on paternity leave as such in Switzerland. The law only stipulates 14 weeks of maternity leave. Fathers can still only take one day off to be at the birth of their child. It is at the discretion of the employer as to whether employees also get paternity leave on top.

But things could soon be changing, with all fathers in future being entitled to take ten days of paid leave in the first six months after the birth of their child – either all at once or by the day. This, at least, is the voting proposal due to be submitted to the People on 27 September 2020.

Over 30 unsuccessful motions

Paternity leave has been under discussion for years in Switzerland. Over 30 parliamentary motions calling for the introduction of paternity leave, or even parental leave shared between mother and father, have been submitted at federal level since 2003. Yet all of them have been unsuccessful. On each occasion the cost factor was the most important consideration. The federal government has calculated that the outlay needed to cover the latest paternity leave proposal would amount to 230 million francs per year.

A popular initiative that was submitted in 2017, advocating four weeks of paternity leave, is the reason why the Swiss electorate can now vote directly on a statutory ten-day period of leave for new fathers for the first-ever time. The Paternity Leave Now! association withdrew the initiative a year ago to allow parliament to make a counterproposal of ten days instead. This is a compromise, but it still goes too far for some. A cross-party committee, formed in protest against “ever-increasing federal taxation”, collected enough signatures to force this autumn’s referendum.

Fathers should be there for the long haul, say critics

Opponents of the proposal are under no illusions that the role of the father is changing in Switzerland. “Many young women today are highly qualified and want to continue working after childbirth,” says SVP National Councillor Diana Gutjahr, who runs a business herself and heads the referendum committee with other conservative and centre-right politicians. According to Gutjahr, the committee have no problem either with the fact that many fathers nowadays want to take on an active family role. Nevertheless, she adds: “Ten days of state-funded paternity leave does not necessarily turn you into a good dad. Being a father means being there for the long haul – or at least 18 years.”

The referendum committee also criticise two specific elements of the proposal, namely that the two-week period of leave would be funded under the same income compensation scheme originally related to maternity pay, and that the government, in their view, would be meddling in Switzerland’s liberal job market. “Our social security funds are already in debt – we should not be adding to the strain,” says Gutjahr. “The aim of social welfare is to relieve financial hardship and not satisfy every last whim,” she says. Gutjahr also believes that companies would be deprived of the means of offering their own paternity leave to gain a competitive advantage.

The yes camp want fathers to be there from the start

But it is these individual arrangements that supporters of the proposal have a problem with. “Dads need to be able to play an active role in family life right from the start,” says Swiss Social Democratic Party (SP) politician and chairman of the Travail Suisse trade union umbrella organisation, Adrian Wüthrich. “This applies to all fathers and not just those who can afford to take unpaid leave or whose employers already offer extended paternity leave. Switzerland is the only country in Europe with no statutory paternity and parental leave. Yet Swiss dads now play more of a hands-on role than they have ever done.”

Irrespective of the referendum, Hauke Krenz is convinced that it was the right decision for him to stay at home for an extended period when his children were born. “I think you forge a closer, more natural bond with the child that way,” he says. This bond is now even stronger, given that Krenz has since put his job on hold to look after his children full-time. “I don’t want to look back in ten years and regret having missed out on this time,” he says.

Comments (18)
  • André Tschachtli, Deutschland
    André Tschachtli, Deutschland at 23.07.2020
    Als ein seit vielen Jahren in Deutschland lebender Expat kann ich nur entsetzt darüber sein, wie unglaublich rückständig die Schweiz in solchen Dingen ist - unabhängig davon, ob das nun der mehrheitliche Wille des konservativen Volkes ist oder nicht.

    Es beginnt schon beim Begriff "Vaterschaftsurlaub". Ein kleines Kind zuhause zu haben hat nicht das Geringste mit "Urlaub" zu tun - es ist wundervolle, aber kräftezehrende Arbeit, und zwar für viele Jahre. Folgerichtig heißt es in Deutschland deshalb auch nicht "Urlaub", sondern "Elternzeit". Und die kann auf beide Eltern verteilt werden, statt alles wie in der Schweiz voll zu Lasten der Frau gehen zu lassen.

    Und bezüglich "Mit dem staatlich bezahlten Vaterschaftsurlaub von zehn Tagen wird ein Mann nicht zu einem umsorgenden Vater": vollkommen richtig. Aber er lernt aus erster Hand, was von Frauen klaglos erwartet wird. Er lernt Wertschätzung für diese Art von Arbeit. Und mit einer entsprechenden finanziellen Absicherung ist er sogar in der Lage, daran teilzuhaben. Erst das macht ihn zu einem echten "umsorgenden Vater", nicht nur der nach Hause gebrachte Lohnzettel.
    Show Translation
    • Raymond Pencherek, Fort Myers, Florida
      Raymond Pencherek, Fort Myers, Florida at 28.07.2020
      Ausgezeichnet, danke für diesen Beitrag!
      Show Translation
  • OMAR FERRARIO THAILAND 31110 BURIRAM NANGRONG
    OMAR FERRARIO THAILAND 31110 BURIRAM NANGRONG at 24.07.2020
    Unbedingt! Was sind das für alte sture Köpfe in der Regierung. Nur weil sie zu ihrer Zeit keinen hatten, wollen sie es den Jungen nicht gönnen. Ich hatte auch keinen vor 25 Jahren, na und? Ich wünsche mir, dass es angenommen wird. Viele Grüsse aus Thailand.
    Show Translation
    • Renato Besomi, Javea, Alicante
      Renato Besomi, Javea, Alicante at 27.07.2020
      Die Kosten sind wirklich zu hoch. Die meisten Leute in der Schweiz haben sowieso 4 bis 5 Wochen Ferien. Also bei Geburt eine Woche davon beziehen. Aber das wiederum will niemand. Die 230 Millionen täten der AHV auch gut. Was machen die meisten mit dem Vaterschaftsurlaub? Sehr wahrscheinlich Velofahren oder sonstiges Sporttreiben. Wie wäre es mit einem Todesurlaub (wenn jemand in der Familie stirbt) von ca. 2-4 Wochen? Es gäbe noch viele Gründe für mehr Urlaub!!!
      Show Translation
  • Sergio Leuba Fasel, Altea, Espagne
    Sergio Leuba Fasel, Altea, Espagne at 25.07.2020
    Bien entendu que le congé paternité a un coût, mais la présence du père après la naissance d'un enfant n'est pas qu'une question de financement. Pour un pays réputé riche et qui annonce ses superavit avec tambours et trompettes la Suisse fait plutôt triste mine concernant le "congé paternité"!
    COMPARONS Jusqu'à present en Suisse, la loi accorde 1 jour au nouveau père! En Espagne, le père a droit a un congé payé de 12 semaines qui va passer dès l'an prochain à 16 semaines pour equiparer les congés parentaux. Autres pays...autres moeurs...
    Show Translation
  • Ronald Thoma Ontario Canada
    Ronald Thoma Ontario Canada at 25.07.2020
    I'm surprised Switzerland, one of the wealthiest Country in the World is soooo behind in that case!?
    If you ever gave birth to a child you know how much energy it takes away from the mother. Evan without complications giving birth the mother is in pain and discomfort.
    The support of the Daddy is so important for the new born baby and the Mother. It's a good investment for the whole family and even more so for the whole Country. I am a proud Schwiizer, and I pray that Switzerland is doing the right decision and say Yes to more availability for Dads.
    Show Translation
  • Peter Schwerzmann, Pattaya, Thailand
    Peter Schwerzmann, Pattaya, Thailand at 25.07.2020
    Ja, wenn man es sich leisten kann, dann soll man den Vaterschafts-Urlaub machen. Je unabhängiger jemand ist, desto schwerer kann man ihn ausbeuten. Diese simple Erkenntnis veranlasste die Mächtigen aller Zeiten dazu, die Machtlosen in Abhängigkeit zu halten. Durch Erziehung und Schule lernt man bereits frühzeitig, nicht aus der Reihe zu tanzen, brav zu sein und sich der Gemeinschaft anzupassen.
    Durch den Welthandel importieren wir mit den Produkten die Armut der Billigländer. Man kann somit durch Sozialabbau und sinkendem Gehaltsniveau konkurenzfähig bleiben und das normale Volk muss als Arbeitnehmer und Schuldner bestehen bleiben.
    Innerhalb eines Jahres arbeiten wir fürs Auto, Schuldzinsen, Mieten, Telefon, Steuern, Lebensmittel, Kleidung, Ferien, Versicherungen, Staatsapparat, für Rüstung, Kirchensteuer, zuviel gekaufte Ware, Medikamente, für versteckte Zinsen usw.
    Wir werden zu Masslosigkeit erzogen, jedes erwachsene Familienmitglied braucht sein eigenes Auto. Es ist diese Endlosschleife
    die uns gefangen hält.
    Show Translation
  • Matthieu Hösli, France
    Matthieu Hösli, France at 25.07.2020
    La Suisse c'est le moyen-âge au niveau du soutien aux familles. Déjà 10 jours semblent pitoyables au regard de ce que rapporte l'employé suisse. Cela devrait être six mois pour les deux parents, dont minimum 16 semaines pour la mère.
    De manière cocasse, les mêmes qui critiquent ce projet bien trop modéré sont ceux qui veulent priver l'économie des jeunes hommes entre 25 et 40 ans en les envoyant 3 ou 4 semaines PAR ANNÉE, tourner en rond et boires des verres au frais du contribuable lors de cette absurdité que sont les cours de répétition. Cette perte économique massive pour les employeurs aux frais de collectivité et pour un résultat sécuritaire nul (mais une hausse de vente de pinard et bières dans les bars proches des casernes), ne semble pas les déranger...
    J'invite tous les suisses de l'étranger à voter en septembre pour offrir à ces référendaires impudents la baffe électorale qu'ils méritent!
    Show Translation
    • Myriam Tercero, Espagne
      Myriam Tercero, Espagne at 29.07.2020
      Absolument d'accord, il semble que les cours de répétition ne gênent personne alors que le congé maternité on en fait tout un plat! Je suis heureuse qu'enfin un congé paternité soit envisagé même s'il pourrait être plus long. Je pense qu'il est vraiment l'heure pour la Suisse de faire ce pas!
      Show Translation
  • Beulah Fischer, England
    Beulah Fischer, England at 25.07.2020
    I think that the modern dads taking paternity leave is a great idea, but after the pandemic, companies will battle to cope with holiday leave never mind paternity leave.
    Show Translation
  • Jean-Pierre Maire, Espagne, 26900 Torrente, Valencia.
    Jean-Pierre Maire, Espagne, 26900 Torrente, Valencia. at 25.07.2020
    Depuis l'extérieur, je vis hors de la suisse depuis plus de 20 ans. Une contradiction sociale évidente avec le niveau général du pays. C'est presque rageant de voir des discussions à ce sujet. Pas digne et pingre.
    Show Translation
  • Jean Perrod,  Miami
    Jean Perrod, Miami at 26.07.2020
    Le commentaire de Diane Gutjahr: Le congé de paternité ne fait pas de l'homme un père prevenant.
    Seriously!!!! Was she ever a mom? When my son was born, my wife got really sick and had to spend a month at the CHUV. Guess who had to quit his job to take care of the baby? I never regretted an instant. I have an incredible bond with my son and daughter. Of course there are men out there who should not be fathers, but for the rest of us PLEASE do the right thing and move out of the middle ages.
    Show Translation
  • Claude-Alain Guyot, France, 70190 Cirey
    Claude-Alain Guyot, France, 70190 Cirey at 27.07.2020
    Je suis totalement contre! Un père peux prendre des congés sur ses vacances pour s'occuper de son enfant, ou si c'est possible cumuler un excédent d'heures dans les 8 mois qui précèdent la naissance pour être à la maison le jour venu! Enfin, la journée de travail ne fait que 8 heures, le reste du temps, il peut s'occuper de bébé et soulager ainsi la maman! Halte à l’assistanat permanent, la société n'a pas à payer pour le désir de paternité des papas, ce n'est pas parce que ça se fait ailleurs que c'est bien, regarder l'endettement de ces pays "sociaux"!
    Show Translation
    • Dominique Gilliéron, Montréal, Canada
      Dominique Gilliéron, Montréal, Canada at 27.07.2020
      J’ai eu le plaisir de devenir père de trois enfants au Québec, avec la possibilité de prendre 5 semaines de congé payé de paternité durant l’année suivant leur naissance. Ma conjointe avait un an de congé maternité qu’elle aurait pu partager avec moi, ce que j’ai fait pour deux mois avec l’un de mes trois enfants! Quel plaisir d’être proche de ses enfants lorsqu’ils sont tout petits!
      Et oui, cela a un coût! Pourtant le Canada et le Québec ne sont pas trop endettés et font même bonne figure sur ce point! Il s’agit surtout d’un choix de priorités lorsque l’on parle de finances. Et le peuple suisse n’a définitivement pas les mêmes priorités que le peuple québécois lorsque l’on regarde par exemple, le budget accordé à l’industrie de l’armement suisse pour protéger ce magnifique pays!
      Malgré ce piètre potentiel petit pas en avant, je me console en voyant que les jeunes pères suisses ont compris qu’ils pouvaient faire évoluer la mentalité suisse sur ce point! Allez la Suisse: Hop, un petit pas en avant, pas trop vite!
      Show Translation
    • Gil Viry, Edimbourg, UK
      Gil Viry, Edimbourg, UK at 29.07.2020
      Rien ne justifie l'écart entre le congé maternité et le congé paternité. Il faut aller bien plus loin avec un congé à partager entre parents, mais ce vote va dans le bon sens.
      Et pour ceux qui crient à "l'assistanat" et à "l'emprise" de l'Etat, il ne faut pas oublier que l'absence de politique familiale en Suisse fait reposer la responsabilité aux mères. Parler de libre choix individuel est hypocrite et mensonger.
      Show Translation
  • Ursula Anliker, Bangkok, Thailand
    Ursula Anliker, Bangkok, Thailand at 27.07.2020
    Switzerland shines as a commendable example in many ways. But on the subject of maternity leave/absence it is indeed a sobering wake-up call. How can in our modern days 1 day leave for the father respectively 14 days for the mother be justified? The family is the pillar of society. Does family really count so poorly in Switzerland?
    Worse... what doesn't seem to be taken into consideration at all, is the fact that this is very trying for small families in Switzerland. Many women never recover well, as they are too overwhelmed from the experience. Many families are forced to send their new born to strangers for care, not by choice, but by circumstances. And this is not favorable for newborn babies. Unfortunately this has impacted generations.
    It's hard to comprehend, how our Swiss system can be so backward in this particular matter, and is actually limping way behind most other countries around the world. It's time to make life better for young families.
    Show Translation
  • Maya Obst, Deutschland, Düsseldorf
    Maya Obst, Deutschland, Düsseldorf at 29.07.2020
    Ich bin Auslandsschweizerin, lebe von Geburt an in Deutschland und bin gerade mal wieder in Graubünden. Beim Gespräch mit meiner Cousine, die 2 kleine Kinder hat, war ich mal wieder entsetzt, wie benachteiligt die Frauen in der Schweiz beruflich sind, wenn sie Kinder bekommen. Sie müssen sich schon nach 4 Monaten entscheiden, ob sie wieder arbeiten gehen oder ganz Zuhause bleiben. Außerdem gibt es so gut wie keine Möglichkeiten für den Vater, mehr Zeit mit den Kindern zu verbringen und die Betreuungsangebote sind extrem teuer.
    Ich bin vor 1 1/2 Jahren selbst Mutter geworden und aktuell sehr froh, dass es in Deutschland die Elternzeit + das Elterngeld gibt. Durch das Aufteilen der Zeit zwischen den Eltern kamen wir auf insgesamt 14 Monate Elterngeld. Ich blieb die ersten 7 Monate Zuhause und mein Mann die nächsten 7. Nun arbeiten wir beide nur noch 30 Stunden/ Woche können aber wieder in Vollzeit zurück wenn wir wollen.
    Es ist so schön zu sehen, welch enge Bindung unsere Tochter durch die gemeinsame Zeit zu ihrem Vater bekommen hat und auch für ihn war es eine sehr wertvolle Erfahrung. Diese Chance wünsche ich auch jungen Familien in der Schweiz.
    Show Translation
  • Maya Obst, Düsseldorf, Deutschland
    Maya Obst, Düsseldorf, Deutschland at 04.08.2020
    Ich bin Auslandsschweizerin, lebe von Geburt an in Deutschland und bin gerade mal wieder in Graubünden. Beim Gespräch mit meiner Cousine, die zwei kleine Kinder hat, war ich mal wieder entsetzt, wie benachteiligt die Frauen in der Schweiz beruflich sind, wenn sie Kinder bekommen. Sie müssen sich schon nach vier Monaten entscheiden, ob sie wieder arbeiten gehen oder ganz zuhause bleiben. Außerdem gibt es so gut wie keine Möglichkeiten für den Vater, mehr Zeit mit den Kindern zu verbringen. Und die Betreuungsangebote sind extrem teuer.
    Ich bin vor 1 1/2 Jahren selbst Mutter geworden und aktuell sehr froh, dass es in Deutschland die Elternzeit plus das Elterngeld gibt. Durch das Aufteilen der Zeit zwischen den Eltern kamen wir auf insgesamt 14 Monate Elterngeld. Ich blieb die ersten 7 Monate Zuhause und mein Mann die nächsten 7. Nun arbeiten wir beide nur noch 30 Stunden/Woche, können aber wieder in Vollzeit zurück, wenn wir wollen.
    Es ist so schön zu sehen, welch enge Bindung unsere Tochter durch die gemeinsame Zeit zu ihrem Vater bekommen hat und auch für ihn war es eine sehr wertvolle Erfahrung. Diese Chance wünsche ich auch jungen Familien in der Schweiz.
    Show Translation

Write new comment

Comments are approved within one to three days. The editorial team reserves the right not to publish discriminatory, racist, defamatory or inflammatory comments. Our detailed comment rules are available here.
 

Auslandschweizer Organisation
Alpenstrasse 26
3006 Bern, Schweiz

tel +41 31 356 61 10
fax +41 31 356 61 01
revue@aso.ch