The big election survey

“Swiss Review” asked the country’s seven most popular political parties to give clear and concise answers to some fundamental questions. We have printed their answers here as a guide to all those who wish to vote in the federal elections on 20 October.

Short portrait of the country’s seven most popular political parties

BDP

Conservative Democratic Party (BDP); centrist party founded in 2008 as a splinter group from the SVP. 2015 election: 4.1%. Current political weight: 7 seats in National Council, 1 seat in Council of States. www.bdp.info

CVP

Christian Democrat People’s Party (CVP); centrist party with conservative/Catholic roots. 2015 election: 11.6%. Current political weight: 26 seats in National Council, 14 seats in Council of States, 1 seat in Federal Council. www.cvp.ch

FDP

Formerly Free Democratic Party; merged with the Liberal Party (2009) to establish “FDP. The Liberals”. 2015 election: 16.4%. Current political weight: 33 seats in National Council, 12 seats in Council of States, 2 seats in Federal Council. www.fdp.ch

GLP

Green Liberal Party; centrist party founded in 2007 as a moderate splinter group of the left-leaning Greens. 2015 election: 4.6%. Current political weight: 8 seats in National Council. www.grunliberale.ch

Green Party

Left-wing party whose roots go back to the anti-nuclear movement as well as civil society groups. 2015 election: 7.1%. Current political weight: 11 seats in National Council, 1 seat in Council of States. www.gruene.ch

SVP

Swiss People’s Party; right-wing national-conservative party; strongest party since 2003. 2015 election: 29.4%. Current political weight: 64 seats in National Council, 5 seats in Council of States, 2 seats in Federal Council. www.svp.ch

SP

Swiss Social Democratic Party; only left-wing party in government; roots go back to labour movement. 2015 election: 18.8%. Current political weight: 42 seats in National Council, 12 seats in Council of States, 2 seats in Federal Council. www.sp-ps.ch

Demographic change is affecting social welfare funding. Should the current Swiss retirement age (64 for women, 65 for men) be increased?

BDP

YES
A retirement age of 65 for men and women is essential to cover the cost of Old-Age and Survivors’ Insurance (OASI).

CVP

YES
A gradual alignment of the retirement age is the key to sustainable welfare funding, but women should not be left to shoulder the costs. Any payment gaps during maternity leave will need to be offset.

FDP

YES
Firstly, men and women need to have the same retirement age of 65. In view of demographic change, genuine measures need to be discussed over the long term.

GLP

YES
Demographic change gives us no choice but to increase the retirement age and take a more flexible approach to retirement.

Green Party

NO
Women face a considerable pension deficit due to lower wages and unpaid care leave. Unless we offset this deficit, increasing the retirement age is unfair.

SVP

YES
A retirement age of 65 for men and women is essential to cover the cost of Old-Age and Survivors Insurance (OASI).

SP

NO
The situation for older workers on the job market is alarming, with long-term unemployment and the proportion of welfare recipients both increasing. Age discrimination is a real problem.

On 14 June 2019, hundreds of thousands of women throughout Switzerland went on strike to protest against gender inequality and violence against women. Which of the strike demands need to be addressed in the newly elected parliament?

BDP

  • Equal pay for equal work. Both sexes must receive equal remuneration.

  • It is vital that we make it easier for people to balance their family and career.

  • The introduction of paternity leave is an urgent necessity. The BDP believes that paid parental leave for both parents would be even better.

CVP

  • Equal pay for men and women – this is vital for a society that believes in education for all and in the integral role that women play in the world (of work).

  • The CVP also wants more flexible working arrangements, such as part-time jobs and flexible working hours that facilitate professional reintegration.

  • No more discrimination against women with regard to social welfare. Unpaid care and low-wage professions put women at a disadvantage at retirement age – compensatory measures are vital.

  • Women need better protection against violence and abuse.

FDP

  • Many women today still have to decide between having a career or having children, or are unable to work as much as they actually want. This is why tax deductions are vital to cover childcare costs. This will give women added incentive to work.

  • We also need more flexible home-working hours, because our rigid labour laws are a relic of the industrial age.

  • The FDP would also scrap the high tax bracket for double-income married couples and replace it with individual taxation.

GLP

  • It goes without saying that the GLP advocates gender equality as well as the equality of all family models and lifestyles.

  • This includes ensuring equal pay for equal work as well as equal treatment with regard to tax and social security legislation.

  • In particular, the introduction of individual taxation and the abolishment of the coordination deduction for occupational pension schemes are key elements in this regard.

Green Party

The Greens advocate a liberal society in which men and women are equal, materially independent, and free to choose how they live. The prerequisites for this are:

  • Enforcement of equal pay

  • Welfare protection for unpaid carers

  • Paid parental leave, as practised in the EU

  • Better protection against domestic violence

  • Measures to combat double discrimination against female migrants

SVP

  • Violence against women has its roots in the failure of immigrants to integrate into our society. This is why we need to put a cap on immigration.

  • We must make it crystal clear to existing immigrants that they must abide by our laws and values.

SP

The SP advocates a range of measures to promote equality:

  • Paid parental leave lasting a total of 38 weeks, the right to part-time employment, and better protection against dismissal for young parents

  • Free childcare for families with low or middle incomes

  • Child maintenance advances for everyone

  • Paid care leave, care allowances, and part-time employment for family caregivers

  • Substantial fines in the event of wage discrimination

  • External support and higher levels of compensation in the event of sexual harassment at the workplace

Swiss healthcare costs and health insurance premiums continue to rise each year. Which are the three most important ways to counter this trend?

BDP

  • Strengthen patient autonomy, either through integrated forms of healthcare or through a deliberate increase in the excess and the co-insurance amount.
  • Facilitate uniform funding of inpatient and outpatient care. Premium payers are being charged too much under the current system.
  • Embrace digitalisation by making greater use of leading-edge communication. It is high time to introduce electronic patient records.

CVP

  • Take action to cut healthcare costs – the CVP is petitioning for a referendum on this matter to prevent premium increases from outstripping wage growth. Prevention of unnecessary treatment will allow the healthcare sector to cut costs but maintain the same standard of care.
  • Avoid expensive and potentially harmful overtreatment of medical cases. It is high time to change the healthcare sector’s excessive and outdated tariffs.
  • Promote outpatient care and reduce hospital capacities.

FDP

  • There is no single panacea. Instead, all stakeholders must work together to address the problem. A whole body of measures are necessary. For example, patients want to see a correlation between quality and cost.
  • Put an end to expensive false incentives such as the “arms race” among cantonal hospitals.
  • Patients, too, need to be more aware of the cost of their own healthcare. Innovations such as voluntary health savings accounts offering Pillar-3-style tax exemptions could be the way forward.

GLP

  • The GLP wants a healthcare system that provides coverage to the entire population while encouraging personal responsibility and prevention.
  • We need freedom of choice and competition – not false incentives. A standardised approach to funding inpatient and outpatient care is one of the things that would help in this regard. Volume-based wage incentives for hospital doctors ought to be abolished.
  • We must strengthen and promote awareness of patient rights.

Green Party

  • Our priority is to strengthen primary care while improving prevention and coordination, e.g. through public health insurance.
  • We must focus more on promoting and funding projects that offer an intelligent combination of advice, prevention, treatment and care.
  • As long as the socially unacceptable principle of per capita premiums continues to apply, corrective measures are needed. The Greens are in favour of socially responsible premium reductions and oppose cost-cutting.

SVP

  • We all need to take greater responsibility ourselves. For example, outpatient visits to GPs or hospitals should incur a symbolic excess fee for every new case, payable in cash. This amount should be twice as much at hospitals as at independent GP practices.
  • We need to stop expanding the range of mandatory benefits in Swiss primary care in an ill-thought-out fashion (e.g. fertility preservation for cancer patients).

SP

  • Manage outpatient admissions more effectively – the cantons need to be able to determine which new GP practices are to be opened according to demand.
  • Reduce the price of medicine by introducing a benchmark pricing system and by improving transparency in relation to pharmaceutical research costs and ex-factory pricing.
  • Introduce pricing models that promote cooperation among service providers and enhance coordinated care (overhaul of the TARMED tariff system).

Well-integrated foreign nationals barely have any say in how Switzerland is run. This, in turn, has led to criticism of the voting rights enjoyed by Swiss Abroad who have never lived in their home country. Should foreigners who have lived in Switzerland for at least ten years be allowed to vote?

BDP

NO
Having the right to vote is a key privilege of being Swiss.

CVP

NO
The right to vote should continue to be limited to Swiss citizens. Only then can we ensure effective social and political integration.

FDP

Neither YES nor NO
Cantons and municipalities should be free to decide themselves.

GLP

YES
Well-integrated foreign nationals should at least be able to vote at cantonal and municipal level.

Green Party

YES
It should be a given that anyone who lives here is able to vote. We have launched corresponding initiatives in a number of cantons.

SVP

NO
Swiss citizens have both rights and obligations. Hence, people should only have the right to vote if they become Swiss citizens.

SP

YES
The fact that a quarter of Switzerland’s resident population have no political rights is a scandalous stain on our democracy.

 

A popular initiative submitted this summer aims to put a limit on arms exports. Should there be a ban on arms exports to countries that are at war or affected by civil war?

BDP

YES
The BDP helped launch the initiative. The Federal Council should no longer be left to rule on this. The arms industry will also benefit in the long term if we achieve dialogue and a broad consensus.

CVP

NO
We support the Swiss arms industry. Our current provisions are adequate and significantly limit the extent to which arms can be exported to countries that are at war or affected by civil war.

FDP

NO
A blanket ban would be a step too far.

GLP

YES
The GLP is a member of the initiative committee.

Green Party

YES
The Green Party wants a total ban on all arms exports. Switzerland should actively promote peace by taking advantage of its special role as a neutral country with a humanitarian tradition.

SVP

NO
Our national security depends on the arms industry and its ability to export. Our arms exporters are already subject to stringent regulations.

SP

YES
Switzerland has better things to offer to war-torn regions than weapons. Its own security is also dependant on being able to resolve conflict through negotiation.

Air traffic is having an extremely negative impact on the world’s climate. Should Switzerland introduce a CO2 tax on airline tickets?

BDP

YES
We need to protect our climate. We should not let major carbon emitters off the hook.

CVP

YES
Air travel is too cheap at present. The airline industry must also work to reduce its greenhouse gas emissions.

FDP

YES
However, any tax will need to be economically viable, with most of its proceeds redistributed to the Swiss population, and the rest going towards a climate fund to finance a range of innovations.

GLP

YES
We submitted a motion about this to the National Council quite some time ago.

Green Party

YES
The airline industry must also do its bit to combat climate change. All of Switzerland’s neighbouring countries already have this tax in place.

SVP

NO
An individual tax in Switzerland is of no benefit to our climate. Aeroplanes will continue to take off regardless. Do we want the wealthy to be the only ones who can afford to travel in future?

SP

YES
Any green tax on plane tickets should vary depending on the distance and the cabin class flown. The Swiss population should be refunded the cost of this levy in full.

What other individual climate policy measures do you regard as a priority for the next legislative period?

BDP

  • We need a binding domestic target on CO2 emissions.

  • Global warming of no more than 1.5° C should be our ambitious target.

  • It is high time that we started an offensive to promote energy-efficient buildings.

  • We need a sustainable financial sector.

  • We must aim to eliminate fossil fuels by a set deadline.

CVP

  • The CVP wants tighter CO2 legislation. We must prioritise meeting most of the ambitious targets of the Paris Agreement on reducing carbon emissions – and, in doing so, promote innovation, invest in our own country and strengthen our economic standing.

  • We must complete the switch to nuclear-free, 100 per cent clean energy. Swiss-produced renewable energy must replace nuclear energy.

  • The CVP supports the expansion of clean technology. We are committed to the circular economy and the use of regional and seasonal produce. Once again, we need to focus more on creating recyclable products.

FDP

  • A complete overhaul of the CO2 Act is the key to climate policy in the next legislative period, ensuring that we can create a package of effective, consensus-based solutions that will enable Switzerland to achieve its climate targets by 2030. Individual projects will not have the desired impact.

  • Action related to transport and buildings – the biggest greenhouse gas emitters – is a priority. On both counts, we need a clear carbon-cutting plan based on CO2 limits and other measures.

  • The target-setting approach has worked very well in the industrial context. It is crucial that we expand the system further.

GLP

  • Switzerland must meet the terms of the Paris climate agreement. Our country therefore needs an ambitious carbon reduction target as well as stringent quality control in relation to carbon offsetting abroad.

  • Above all, we need effective measures that finally address road and air travel in addition to buildings. We can reverse the environmental trend and exploit the resulting economic potential.

  • By making the deliberate and rapid switch from a funding-based to an incentive-based approach, we will no longer have to rely on subsidies or a whole swathe of regulations.

  • Applying the “user pays” principle to energy tariffs will help to improve the profitability of energy efficiency measures and ensure implementation of clean technology solutions that have already existed for quite some time. This will open up a huge export market for Switzerland.

Green Party

  • Reinforce existing schemes such as the energy-efficient building modernisation programme, the CO2 tax on fuels, and improvements in new-vehicle fuel efficiency.

  • Focus on new aspects: role of the financial sector (gradual withdrawal from investments in fossil fuels); agriculture and food (promote organic farming); emissions generated abroad by imported goods.

  • True to the “polluter pays” principle, we must generate sufficient resources to fund climate protection measures in poorer countries in the southern hemisphere.

SVP

  • Help farmers and their families by strengthening domestic food production. Produce and buy local and seasonal food to help save resources.

  • Reduce polluting traffic jams and improve traffic flow in towns and cities, as this would go long way to ensuring cleaner air.

SP

  • To cut net greenhouse gas emissions to zero by 2050, Switzerland needs to see massive investments in boosting energy efficiency and generating renewable energy (using both private- and public-sector funds).

  • To fund energy-efficient building modernisations and the installation of photovoltaic systems, we must aim to achieve ten billion Swiss francs worth of investment based on public subsidies.

  • We must gradually increase the green tax on fossil fuel heating – and expand this levy to cover fossil fuel propellant and air traffic.

  • We need a public-sector, interest-free climate bond programme that will help to unblock existing investment logjams within the corporate and private-investor sectors.

 

Switzerland’s relationship with the EU is of crucial importance for Swiss who live in EU countries. Is limiting immigration more important than maintaining Switzerland’s bilateral agreements with the EU?

BDP

The BDP is against Switzerland joining the EU. However, this does nothing to alter the fact that Switzerland has close economic and social ties with the EU’s member states. The bilateral approach that we have taken is good for our country – and has been approved by voters more than once. Some of the treaties are good and some have been criticised. Others need revising. Nevertheless, it would be extremely dangerous to think that an unnecessary initiative to limit immigration would neither jeopardise this proven partnership with the EU nor compromise our prosperity.

CVP

No other partner has contributed as much to prosperity in Switzerland as the EU. The EU also benefits greatly from Switzerland. We want a relationship with the EU that hurts neither Switzerland nor the EU. The bilateral agreements are non-negotiable in our view. Switzerland’s voters have already approved them more than once. From enjoying freedom of movement in Europe, to selling our good and services freely across the EU and sharing knowledge – the arrangement benefits us every day. The CVP has always advocated the bilateral path and blocked isolationist attacks. We consequently reject the SVP’s “termination” initiative aimed at torpedoing free movement. An end to free movement would have grave consequences for the economy, for research and for jobs in Switzerland. It would negate all other market-opening agreements (including our research agreement) with the EU.

FDP

The bilateral approach means that we can enjoy tailored access to the EU Single Market without having to join the EU. It has brought jobs, growth and prosperity to Switzerland and enabled hundreds of thousands of us to live and work in the EU/EFTA. The conservative isolationists are jeopardising this success story with their “termination” initiative. Switzerland needs to be able to continue to rely on highly skilled workers from abroad in future. At the same time, the FDP takes the concerns of many Swiss on immigration seriously. We therefore want to take firm action to combat abuses and other detrimental situations such as benefit tourism, restrict the later admission of family dependants of immigrants from outside the EU, and resolve asylum-related issues.

GLP

Not only do we want to keep bilateral agreements, but we also wish to continue improving them. From the outset, the GLP has been the only party committed to a framework agreement.

Green Party

Switzerland is part of Europe. As the pro-European party, we are committed to Switzerland having good relations with our neighbours from the EU. The bilateral agreements benefit the citizens of both Switzerland and the EU. We want this partnership to be strengthened, particularly with regard to education, research and environmental protection. However, good neighbours also play by the rules. A framework agreement with the EU is essential to further development of the bilateral agreements. A pro-European stance will never command majority backing in a popular vote if the accompanying measures on free movement are undermined. To ensure that the EU gives us better protection against wage dumping, Switzerland finally needs to make progress on providing administrative assistance in relation to tax and taking action against tax dumping.

SVP

Controlling and managing immigration is extremely important. Since the introduction of free movement, net immigration to Switzerland has totalled 1.1 million. The squeeze on wages and jobs is noticeable, particularly in the case of the over-50s. We therefore want to restrict the right to immigration through our limitation initiative, while maintaining mutually beneficial trade relations with the EU.

SP

Freedom of movement – the privilege of being able to live and work anywhere in Europe – is a wonderful thing and must be defended at all costs. European integration is the foundation of peace and prosperity on our continent, of which Switzerland is part. However, free movement should not be about companies recruiting as many people from abroad as possible. Instead, we must combat the shortage of skilled workers through massive investments in education. The pool of suitable employees will also increase if we make it easier for people to reconcile family and career as well as ensure that men and women finally receive equal pay. We must enhance labour market integration through additional measures to educate migrants and through extra protection for the over-50s. All of this is necessary to counter the inclination among companies to look exclusively abroad for talent.

Overdevelopment is changing the face of Switzerland. Should more be done to protect the countryside, e.g. through stricter building regulations outside existing building zones?

BDP

NO
We are already engaged in combating overdevelopment. In 2013, voters approved the revised Spatial Planning Act that is now being implemented at cantonal and municipal level.

CVP

NO
We must make better use of existing built-up areas and be proportionate in our choice of building zones. The Spatial Planning Act effectively combats overdevelopment and encourages inward development.

FDP

YES
We need to stop the drip-drip effect of building exceptions outside existing building zones.

GLP

YES
The GLP is in favour of reforms.

Green Party

YES
Construction activity outside building zones is eating up the valuable cropland and semi-natural habitats that help to preserve biodiversity.

SVP

NO
The people decisively rejected stricter regulations by voting “No” to the Urban Sprawl Initiative. To protect our countryside more effectively, we need to curb excessive immigration.

SP

YES
Building stock outside building zones should not be allowed to increase. We should only authorise new builds that are needed for agriculture, and restrict the available options for converting properties.

Animals that were thought to have disappeared from Switzerland are now back in our countryside. However, the return of wolves, lynx and bears is becoming a source of conflict. Should we relax the laws that protect large predators such as these?

BDP

YES
If their populations begin to disturb the local environment, we should relax the laws on a case-by-case basis.

CVP

Neither YES nor NO
The CVP is in favour of relaxing the laws on wolves and beavers, but not on lynx.

FDP

YES
There is general agreement within the FDP that we should alter the laws to control wolf numbers as and where appropriate. We are against relaxing the laws across the board.

GLP

NO
The GLP will actively campaign for a referendum against the National Council’s anti-wolf law.

Green Party

NO
The federal government should invest in preventive measures to protect farm animals, as this would benefit both wild animals and livestock.

SVP

YES
As a densely populated country, Switzerland is an unsuitable habitat for certain large predators.

SP

NO
The SP is against any weakening of the laws protecting lynx, beavers, wolves, etc. We cannot tolerate wild animals and birds being preventively decimated – without having done any harm.

How should we ensure that Swiss Abroad are actually able to exercise their political rights – and particularly their right to vote?

BDP

Electronic voting is a necessity, particularly for the Swiss Abroad. However, we need to ensure that e-voting is fraud-proof.

CVP

Our member of the Council of States, Filippo Lombardi, has already submitted a motion demanding that the cantons be obliged (as part of a federal scheme) to offer e-voting to all Swiss Abroad who are eligible to vote.

FDP

E-voting is crucial if the Swiss Abroad are to exercise their political rights. Postal voting is unreliable as the voting papers often arrive too late. Participation from the Swiss Abroad has been significantly higher in cantons that have tested e-voting successfully. The FDP has always advocated the use of e-voting by voters abroad. We take security concerns seriously and favour a pragmatic ethos of security over speed in rolling out e-voting across the country. We very much regret any technical hitches that may directly affect the Swiss Abroad during this election year.

GLP

Firstly, it is important that people are sent their ballot material in good time. Secondly, the GLP backs the use of e-voting solutions for voters abroad. However, we are against electronic voting being rolled out across the board for general use due to current security concerns.

Green Party

Some three quarters of a million people live in the “Fifth Switzerland”. As a key standard-bearer for Switzerland’s democratic culture, the expatriate community should be able to actively exercise its political rights. In many countries, the voting papers arrive too late or are not even delivered at all. That means a lot of people miss out on being able to vote. This is unacceptable. Given that no e-voting system is completely fraud-proof at the moment, electronic dispatch should be tested as an interim solution, as this would enable punctual delivery of voting papers via the Internet.

SVP

Swiss Abroad can continue to exercise their voting rights in the same way they have always done, i.e. primarily via postal vote.

SP

The SP has long been calling for speedy implementation of secure e-voting, at least for Swiss Abroad. This makes delays all the more regrettable. E-voting will probably not be rolled out in all cantons any time soon, so we must look into making improvements to the current system, e.g. centralised delivery of voting papers via cantonal chancelleries or cantonal capitals (as practised by the city of Zurich in the canton of Zurich) instead of via every individual municipality; electronic dispatch of documents; and the option of submitting votes in person or by post via a consulate.

Swiss living abroad have precious little opportunity of being elected to parliament. A dedicated constituency would significantly improve Swiss expatriates’ electoral prospects. Would you welcome such a thing?

BDP

NO
We believe that Swiss who live abroad have no less of chance of being elected as Swiss who live in Switzerland.

CVP

NO
Swiss expatriates are on an equal legal footing to their compatriots with regard to representation on the National Council. We need to remove the obstacles to exercising voting rights (via e-voting).

FDP

NO
“Quotas” or constituencies for individual communities go against Switzerland’s federal ethos and principles of democracy.

GLP

Neither YES nor NO
The GLP has not yet formulated a position on this issue.

Green Party

YES
The “Fifth Switzerland” needs some form of political representation that will take account of its specific interests and circumstances.

SVP

NO
The cantons play a very important role in our federal system. They are the 26 electoral constituencies, and we should keep it like that.

SP

YES
The SP has been advocating this for some time. Countries like Italy, France and Portugal have proved that it works.

The Swiss Abroad represent an ever-increasing proportion of the electorate. Why should Swiss citizens living abroad vote for your party?

BDP

The BDP works calmly and pragmatically to represent all Swiss, regardless of where they live. We believe that Switzerland, as a cosmopolitan country, should strive to maintain the best possible relations with other countries. In particular, this includes being on good terms with the EU, with which we not only share economic relations but cultural ties and common values as well. The BDP is committed to preventing these links from being broken – and ensuring that both Switzerland and the EU maintain their prosperity.

CVP

The CVP wants a country that sticks together – this includes the “Fifth Switzerland”. We have been defending the interests of the Swiss Abroad for years. For example, the Swiss Abroad Act was the result of a parliamentary initiative by the CVP. We are committed to ensuring that Swiss expatriates continue to enjoy access to Swiss bank payment facilities, and particularly Swiss bank accounts and credit cards. The CVP is also campaigning for the introduction of e-voting, which would make it much easier for the Swiss Abroad to have their voice heard in elections and popular votes. Making sure that the system is fraud-proof takes absolute priority. Furthermore, the CVP is working to combat job market discrimination against Swiss dual citizens who live abroad. We support the provision of federal financial assistance to fund new Swiss schools abroad.

FDP

The FDP is working resolutely and constructively for a Switzerland that is open and connected to the world. Half a million Swiss currently live in EU/EFTA countries. The Swiss-EU bilateral agreements – particularly the agreement on the free movement of persons – therefore provide these citizens with their legal basis. We are vehemently opposed to the unholy alliance of isolationists from the left to right across the political spectrum. Maintaining and consolidating the bilateral approach is one of the FDP’s key priorities.

GLP

The Green Liberals advocate a Switzerland that is open and connected to the world. For example, we actively support a framework agreement that will consolidate the bilateral agreements with the EU. Furthermore, we advocate free trade as well as an active foreign policy that is conducive to peace, democracy, the rule of law, environmental protection, and human rights.

Green Party

The Green movement is fighting as one in over 100 countries to protect natural resources around the world, promote fair trade, preserve universal basic rights, and encourage a climate of respect and openness. We are driving action on climate change and advocating sustainable farming as a means of preserving biodiversity and food sovereignty. The Greens build bridges, not walls. We are committed to a peaceful society that has no place for discrimination or exclusion.

SVP

Many Swiss Abroad already vote for the SVP. They have a clear understanding of what constitutes a united, free Switzerland, and have had direct experience of the challenges faced in other countries. The SVP cares for Switzerland and is committed to our country’s traditions, culture and inherent values.

SP

The SP wants a cosmopolitan, equitable, green Switzerland that enjoys good, strong relations with the EU. This is why we have long been calling for an institutional agreement that safeguards wages. Switzerland is committed to the free movement of persons as well as good jobs and education for everyone. We still have a lot of work ahead to achieve gender equality. Switzerland must also multiply its efforts to combat climate change and achieve the goals of the Paris climate agreement.

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